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3

گوینده

Original

زمان

20:50

منبع

Bob and Rob

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MP3 کامل

دانلود

نسخه کامل (آنلاین):

برای مشاهده معنی روی کلمات کلیک کنید

Iran

 Before reading check these out:       

Vocabulary (in this context)

Words

 

Definition

did a ski season

exp

this informal term means to spend the whole winter in a ski resort having fun on the

slopes. Usually young people (21 – 30) only go on such trips.

 

ski bum

exp

this slang term refers to someone who is usually doing a ski season;

 

serendipity

noun

Origin: Serendip ancient name of Sri Lanka; because it was an ability possessed by the main characters in the old Persian story The Three Princes of Serendip

خوشبختی

Plateau

noun

large areas of land at high levels. Can also refer to an activity that has stopped developing e.g:

many learners find it difficult to get past the intermediate plateau.

فلات، زمین  مسطح.

 

high-class

adj.

A synonym is upper class. Rob is actually working class though

 

recreational

adj.

for fun

تفریحی، سرگرمی

serve as

verb

official capacity or designation.

بکار رفتن / گرفته شدن

antiquity

noun

ancient times

عهد عتیق، روزگار باستان

dissemination

noun

the discussion and spreading of ideas widely.

انتشار.پخش

tie-in

verb

connect to

ربط دادن

came out of my mouth

expr.

something said

بیان شده

premier league

noun

if you’re not familiar with English football (US = soccer), other famous teams include

Liverpool, Arsenal and Chelsea.

لیگ برتر

empathize

verb

the ability to imagine and experience someone’s feelings. The noun is empathy.

همدردی کردن

pun

 

a word that sounds the same but has a different meaning.

Example: A pessimist's blood type is always B-negative. (B- or Be negative)

جناس

private space

noun

also known as personal space, an imaginary circle that exits around us.

 

miscellaneous

adj.

an assortment of different items.

گوناگون ، متفرقه

mike

noun

a ‘mike’ is the shortened version of microphone.

میکروفن

jut out

verb

to stick out and be noticeable.

پيشرفتگى داشتن ،جلو رفتن

abundant

adj.

plenty of something.

فراوان ، وافر

(to be) in someone’s shoes

 

Idiom

To be in someone’s position or circumstances.

جای کسی بودن

on a shoestring

Idiom

To do something with very little money.

 

exile

verb

to force someone to leave their country, especially for political reasons

تبعید کردن

fact

noun

a piece of information that is known to be true

واقعیت

population

noun

the number of people living in a particular area, country etc

جمعیت

caviar

noun

 

خاویار

drug

noun

 

دارو، مواد مخدر

humanity

noun

the quality of being human

بشریت

approximately

adv.

close to the exact number, amount etc, but could be a little bit more or less than it

تقریبا

linguist

noun

 

زبانشناس

civilization

noun

a society that is well organized and developed, used especially about a particular society in a particular place or at a particular time

تمدن

carpet

noun

 

فرش

rug

noun

a piece of thick cloth or wool that covers part of a floor, used for warmth or as a decoration

قالیچه

trilingual

adj.

able to speak three languages

 

sew

verb

to use a needle and thread to make or repair clothes or to fasten something such as a button to them

دوختن

stink

adj.

 

بد بو بودن (فعل: بوی بد دادن)

bonus

noun

 

جایزه

crossed legs

expr.

 

پا روی پا گذاشتن (هنگام نشستن)

horrible

adj.

very bad - used for example about things you see, taste, or smell

 

Be in someone’s league

expr.

to be be as good as someone

در سطح کسی بودن

 

 

Grammar

quite (adverb)

 

 

     quiet = be silent.

     quit = stop; live.

 

1. quite قید است و باید قبل از صفات استفاده بشه و به معنی "تا حدودی" میباشد:

quite big / good / cold / warm / interesting

 

2. همیچین هنگامی که با اسم استفاده شود باید قبل از a یا an بیاید. (quite + a/an + adjective + noun)

quite a short time (NOT a quite short time)

 

3. قبل از افعال (like, enjoy, understand and agree) برای بیان علایق و نظراتمون استفاده میکنیم.

I quite like tennis but I can never play proper games because I can’t serve. (I like tennis a bit.)

I quite enjoy sitting here and watching people go by. (I like it a lot.)

I quite agree. You’re absolutely right. (I agree completely.)

I can quite understand that the news would have upset her. (I totally understand.)

 

 

 

Transcript

BOB

Hi, it's the Bob and Rob Show. This is, Bob.

ROB

And, this is, Rob. Good afternoon, everybody.

BOB

Good afternoon. Today, we're talking about Iran.

ROB

Or, as some people say in the States, "Iran."

BOB

That's true. You don't say that in the UK?

ROB

No, we say, "Iran."

BOB

Iran. And before 1935 most people, I believe, called that area of the world Persia.

ROB

Yes, yes, right.

BOB

Persia - the land of Persia. Actually, Iran became an Islamic republic in 1979 after the ruling Shah was forced into exile. So, today we're talking about the country of Iran.

ROB

And, a little bit later on in the show, we're going to have an interview with one of our friends who’s from Iran, originally.

BOB

We've got everything for you today on the Bob and Rob Show. Any interesting facts about Iran that we can tell our listeners?

ROB

Sure. The population of Iran is over sixty-eight million.

BOB

That's quite populous.

ROB

The land is mostly arid, or semi-arid, and it's one of the world’s most rugged mountainous areas.

BOB

Hey, that's good for you. You should visit there.

ROB

With plateaus I'd love to.

BOB

A lot of mountains to climb.

ROB

Definitely.

BOB

When a lot of Americans think of Iran, they think of oil, or maybe, Persian rugs, but Iran actually has some of the world’s best caviar.

ROB

Is that so? That's interesting. I didn't know that.

BOB

Do you like caviar?

ROB

I do, it's good. Because, I'm high-class.

BOB

Are you high-class, or are you, just high? "High," actually, means "to do a drug," so if you’re "high," you’re doing drugs. That was my bad joke. Rob's not high - he's just high on life.

ROB

That's a good joke. Some of the contributions that Iran, and Iranians, have made to humanity are: Persians first discovered algebra,

BOB

Oh, so they’re responsible for that. I hated Algebra in school.

ROB

It's difficult. And they invented the windmill, and they found medical uses for alcohol.

BOB

Medical uses of alcohol - well, I certainly am familiar with the recreational uses of alcohol. Maybe, a little bittoo familiar. If your visiting Iran in the near future, the Bob and Rob Show recommends, Esfahan, one of the oldest Iranian cities. It’s approximately 2500 years old, and it’s a world heritage site. It served as the capitolof Persia between 1598 and 1722. So, that's one site we officially recommend.

ROB

Interesting stuff. Definitely, I'd love to go there. Have you been to Iran?

BOB

I have not, but I would love to go.

ROB

Yea, me too. So would I. I'd also love to go skiing at Dizin

 - I think it's pronounced.

BOB

What? Skiing in Iran?

ROB

Yea, incredible.

BOB

I'd never heard of skiing in Iran before.

ROB

Apparently, there's skiing in a place called, Dizin, D-I-Z-I-N.

BOB

Did you say, "zed," or "z"?

ROB

Well, in Britain we say, "zed." We get it correct.

BOB

As you know, or you may not know, the language of Iran is Farsi. Let's listen to a little bit more about Farsi, okay?

ROB

Cool, yea, okay.

OTHER

Farsi, is in fact, the language of Iran. And the Iran of today, is just a fraction of the vast Iranian lands, or the Iranian Empire of centuries ago. The richness and antiquity of the Farsi language has attracted some renowned linguists over the years, who have dedicated their entire lives to the study and dissemination of Farsi language. Farsi is the second most important language of the world of Islam, and is recognized as the primary language of Islamic Iranian culture and civilization. Many religious, philosophical, agnostic, mystical, and historical works have been originally written in Farsi, and as such, all those who wish to learn Islamic arts and sciences, have chosen to learn Farsi.

BOB

That's a little information about, Farsi, for you Rob.

ROB

Very interesting.

BOB

Can you speak Farsi?

ROB

No, I wish I could. It looks like a difficult language. I imagine it’s difficult.

BOB

Why don't we sit down with a good friend of ours from Iran? He's from Iran - originally, he's from Iran, I should say. He doesn't live in Iran now. Let's ask him a few questions:

ROB

Sure, good idea.

BOB

Okay, let's go. We're off to see Mehran.

BOB:

Okay, Mehran, well thank you very much for coming on the Bob and Rob Show.

MEHRAN:

Sure, my pleasure.

BOB:

I feel like you’ve been here before.

MEHRAN:

Maybe a couple times.

BOB:

So, you’re from Iran?

MEHRAN:

Yes, I am.

BOB:

Mehran from Iran.

MEHRAN:

Mehran from Tehran from Iran.

BOB:

Wow, you’re not from Tehran, though.

MEHRAN:

No, I’m from the southern part of Iran.

BOB:

I see.

ROB:

And, uh, is it right that you left Iran when you were eight?

MEHRAN:

Yes, I left Iran when I was eight. And then I was in the states until eighteen.

BOB:

In California?

MEHRAN:

In California, right.

ROB:

I see.

MEHRAN:

Then went back to Iran, then I was there until I was 22. And then left.  And haven’t been back since then.

BOB:

Wow. Tell us about Persian food.

MEHRAN:

Persian food? I think you’d like it. It’s a …mainly…the staple food in Iran is rice and bread. People usually

have bread, fresh bread, just go buy… for breakfast…go buy bread.

BOB:

You know Mehran gave me some Basmati rice about 3 months ago and I’m hoping he’s going to give me

some more.

ROB:

My image of it is that it’s quite spicy..but is that the case?

MEHRAN:

No, it’s not very spicy, but it depends…actually it depends on the area too. A lot of people think that Iran is just like one race, one language, but it’s not. You know, different areas. In the North food is more bland…simple, in the south, you know, it’s closer to Arab countries…spicier.

BOB:

Mehran, I have a very important question for you: Do you have a Persian rug?

MEHRAN:

I think I told you not to ask me this question before. It’s a big secret so…

BOB:

It must be very expensive.

MEHRAN:

But if you promise not to tell anybody…yes, I’ll tell you. Yes, I do have a rug.

BOB:

Just the 9000 people listening to this show. And your address is?

MEHRAN:

No, stop it!

BOB:

Okay, any other questions?

ROB:

Yeah, what advice would you give, Mehran, to our listeners learning English?

MEHRAN:

Since I learned the language naturally - I mean by living in the U.S., it’s difficult for me to say how to study it, , especially for people who don’t live in America, but learning language for me was like a second nature, and second nature means I was in contact with it naturally every day.  if you can do that, great. If you can’t, try to be in contact with English every day, even 15 minutes, half an hour, 1 hour.

BOB:

So be consistent.

ROB:

Yeah, be consistent. So you’re trilingual? You can speak Japanese, Farsi and English?

MEHRAN:

That’s right, yes.

BOB:

So you speak Farsi, so how would you say, “I love the Bob and Rob Show” in Farsi?

MEHRAN:

In Farsi?  ……………..

ROB:

Sounds difficult.

MEHRAN:

Yeah, it is very difficult. It’s a completely different language.

ROB:

Yeah, yeah, that sounds really unusual to the ear if you’re not use to it.

BOB:

Exotic. Well, Mehran, uh, from Iran, thank you very much for coming on the Bob and Rob Show.

MERHAN:

You’re welcome.

ROB:

Yeah, much appreciated.

MEHRAN:

Sure, my pleasure. Anytime.

ROB

Phrasal verbs, what were we going to do today? Today we're going to look at - well, you were talking about

rugs - rugs are very famous from Iran - Persian rugs. So, if you "sew" something up...

BOB

Good tie-in there.

ROB

You have to sew rugs up.

BOB

To actually sew with a needle and thread. Okay? Another more idiomatic use of "sew up" is "trying to arrange something in an acceptable way," or "bring it to an acceptable conclusion." This is often used in business; for example, "let's try and sew up this business deal, let's bring to an acceptable conclusion."

ROB

Good one.

BOB

"Let's get the negotiations sewn up."

ROB

Right, that makes sense.

BOB

Of course it does, it came out of my mouth.

ROB

Pearls of wisdom. Another interpretation of "to sew something up," is to have control of something, or to be likely to win something. Let me think of an example, - I know you're not really familiar with football, Bob, "but Manchester United, that world famous football club, they’ve pretty much got the premier league sewn up."

BOB

Oh, I see, okay.

ROB

That's the English football division, because they're ten points ahead of their nearest rival.

BOB

So, like "very, very likely to win. "They've got it sewn up."

ROB

Yea, they've got it sewn up.

BOB

Do you say "sewn up," or "sewed up"? I think both are okay - the past tense?

ROB

The past participle is "sewn."

BOB

Sewn, with an "n."

ROB

S-E-W-N

BOB

Some people might say "e-d" too. "Sewed up."

ROB

Yes, S-E-W-E-D.

BOB

Is also, acceptable.

ROB

I think it is, because there are other examples of past participles; like, "learnt," or "learned."

BOB

Exactly - a little flexibility there - you can say, "sewn up", or "sewed up" (ed, or n).

OTHER

Say, what's that down there, in those weeds? I don't know, looks like some kind of shoe. Yea, it is a shoe.

Here, see. What do ya know, a Persian slipper.

BOB

Persian slippers - reminds me of shoes - and maybe we should do some shoe idioms?

ROB

Definitely.

BOB

For example, "in someone's shoes." What do you think that means? Well, you know what it means, but what do you think out there listeners, what does it mean? Can you guess? "in someone's shoes," like, "you know, Rob, you should put yourself into her shoes; she's just lost her job.

ROB

She's going through some bad times at the moment.

BOB

"Put yourself in her shoes, understand where she's coming from."

ROB

Right, so that means "to basically put yourself in their position"

BOB

Yes, to put yourself in someone's position "to empathize with them."

ROB

To see their point of view.

BOB

Exactly. For example, "Rob, if I were in your shoes, I think I would be upset too."

ROB

Because, my feet stink?

BOB

Oh, that's good. Good joke.

ROB

Maybe because my feet are too small.

BOB

That was a pun. "To be in someone's shoes." To be in someone's shoes is to put yourself in their position.

So, for example, "Rob, if I were in your shoes, I would probably consider moving to a better university, because you're such an outstanding teacher with such high intellect."

ROB

Oh, that's very kind of you.

BOB

Joke, joke. Today's bonus idiom is "on a shoestring."

ROB

That's an interesting idiom - "on a shoestring." To do something on a shoestring.

BOB

Have you ever traveled on a shoestring?

ROB

Yes, I have. When I was seventeen, I went around Europe for about a month on a shoestring.

BOB

I traveled around Southeast Asia, as well. Anyway, this will be in the study guide, so check it out there. Okay, today's email bag is by an Iranian listener. He says, "How are you men? Thanks a lot for your fantastic podcast. I have a suggestion: If it's possible, please prepare a show on body language, and its application in different cultures. I think that would be a great show. You can invite listeners of your podcasts to put some notes on the blog about body languages which they use in their country." That's from, Arash, from Iran. Thank you very much, Arash, that's a very interesting topic because body language is a separate language that we use to communicate.

ROB

Sure, yes.

BOB

If you give someone the middle finger in English, you're saying something to them - that you don't like them, or you want to fight them. I think in some ways body language is more important to other cultures than it would be in American culture. Of course, we still use body language but often we put more emphasis on verbal expression and not so much on body language. But again, everyone uses body language. Some cultures, maybe, rely on it a little more than other cultures. Living in Japan is interesting because their body language is very different than in the West.

ROB

Sure, yes, and very different. And gestures, as well.

BOB

Gestures, yea, very, very different. I notice in speeches sometimes, half of the people will have their eyes closed. When I first came here, I thought, ‘how rude, you shouldn't sleep through the speech.' But, apparently, that's completely acceptable: it shows that you're concentrating. I try and do that a lot now. Of course, I'm usually sleeping. Also, I don't know - on trains -

ROB

On trains, in the States and in the UK too, it's okay if when we're sitting down in buses or trains to spread our legs.

BOB

At least men.

ROB

Or, to cross your legs, is it?

BOB

In Japan, it's a bit rude to sit on a train with your legs crossed or spread.

ROB

Yea, that's right.

BOB

How about in the UK, do you find that - at least compared to America - that maybe, you keep more distance from people - you have more private space.

 - you stand farther away than you would in other cultures?

Don't you have a reputation in the UK for...

ROB

For being cold, and horrible. Yes, distant.

BOB

I didn't say "horrible."

ROB

Cold and distant. I guess that's because the UK is an island nation; the same with Japan. Yea, we tend to be a bit more reserved, and perhaps we're more reluctant to hug and kiss like other people do in continental Europe; the Italians...

BOB

Rob, get your hand off my leg right now.

ROB

The Italians and the French very readily kiss one another and hug. But, even friends in the UK don't do that so much.

BOB

I think in America, maybe we do it a little bit more than the British, but not as much as continental Europe.

Anyway, Arash, thank you very much. Very interesting topic, and listeners if you have any examples from your own culture of body language, write about it on the blog.

ROB

And, there will be some interesting links in the study guide on body language and gestures.

BOB

Pictures of your body? Don't scare our listeners away.

ROB

No offense to the listeners.

BOB

By the way Arash, this could have almost been an Ancient English Study Secret. I think since we're talking about Iran today, maybe, we can just call that Ancient Persian English Study Secret.

ROB

Ancient Persian English Study Secret.

BOB

Well, what should we do now, Rob?

ROB

How about some, Both Sides of the Pond? Well, I thought this week we could look at some words which have been introduced into English, which have a Persian origin.

BOB

Fantastic! That ties in perfectly with our topic today, which happens to be, Iran, or Iran.

ROB

Iran. If you meet a big bloke whose chasing you, "I ran away."

 Sorry, Bob. Anyway, yes, last week you mentioned, Bob, about some words in American English from France and Spain. So, "magic."

BOB

That's Persian.

ROB

That's Persian - "magic."

BOB

I didn't know that. Wow! Also, "scarlet"..

ROB

Right, the color - the red color.

BOB

"Scarlet" means "red."

ROB

Yes.

BOB

You say that, in the UK?

ROB

We do. It's also the first name of ladies. "Scarlet"- Scarlet O'Hara from Gone With the Wind. And, "caravan," is Persian.

BOB

"Caravan," that doesn't surprise me. A "caravan" is a "company of travelers in a desert, or hostile region."

"bazaar" too.

ROB

A bazaar, yes.

BOB

It's a market that sells miscellaneous goods. B-A-Z-A-A-R

ROB

Not "bizarre."

BOB:

No, that’s your middle name.

ROB:

And "paradise," is also Persian.

BOB

Really?

ROB

That's interesting, I didn't realize that.

BOB

And, "serendipity." That's a difficult word. What does that mean?

ROB

That means to find something that's fortunate, or good luck, completely by accident.

BOB

So, I guess, our coming together was serendipitous? The fact that Bob, and Rob got a job at the same university...

ROB

And we met...

BOB

And, we're both charming, smart, young men - English teachers - that was very serendipitous.

ROB

That's right, we we're lucky enough to meet each other, and then there's the Bob and Rob Show. Serendipity, a Persian word; very interesting.

ROB

First of all, we like to say, thanks very much for your donations, and if you enjoy the show and are a regular listener please consider making a donation.

BOB

Speaking of donations - maybe you can tell, but we're using new mikes today. Thanks to your donations we have much better microphones and set-ups. Hopefully, this podcast is clearer and louder than it's been in the past. Thank you very much for your donations we put them to good use. We got new microphones.

ROB

Thank you, Bob, for buying this new equipment. It's great. Any support, is very much appreciated, and if you’re interested in receiving the detailed study notes and transcripts, please consider becoming a Bob and Rob Show member.

BOB

Write to us if you have any questions or comments about the show. We're at www.thebobandrobshow.com.

You can also send an email, or a voice message. We do have a voice message link now. Look on the sidebar

in our blog, there's a "Send Us a Voice Mail" button. Don't be shy, don't worry about making mistakes. Rob always makes mistakes.

ROB

All the time. Finally, if you know anybody who may be interested in our show - The Bob and Rob Show - then, please be sure to tell them, let them know.

BOB

And have them tell someone. Today, we talked about Persia, and I thought it would be interesting if we had some Persian quotes on the show. What's one?

ROB

"Use your enemy's hand to catch a snake." That's good, I like that.

BOB

Can I have your hand, Rob? "Whatever is in the heart will come up to the tongue."

ROB

That's nice, too.

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